How To Get The Most From Your Smartphone

Brief Overview

In the third of four episodes on how healthy leaders use their smartphones, Matt and Tal talk about the challenges we face in how we use our phone. Plus, they share a simple framework that you can use today to multiply the benefit you get from your phone.


How To Get The Most From Your Phone

  • Fence. Set boundaries around the time when you use your phone and stay away from your phone.

  • Focus. Leverage tools on your phone to help you stay away from distraction and the myth of multi-tasking.

  • Fill. Make sure that your most significant work makes it into your calendar.

  • Filter. Determine whether your current task requires the use of your phone.

Take a (One-Day) Digital Detox

Brief Overview

In the second of four episodes on how healthy leaders use their smartphones, Matt and Tal talk through the details of taking a 24-hour break from your smartphone. They talk about why we get hooked on our phones, the benefits of taking a 24-hour break from our phones and how to take the next steps to freedom.


Benefits of a Digital Detox:

  • Freedom from FOMO: The fear of missing out (FOMO) is a problem compounded by the way our phones tap into our neurochemistry. A consistent break from your phone disrupts that connection and helps to create healthier phone habits.

  • Freedom from Overwork: Show us the person who is always on their phone, and we’ll show you a person who is working more than they should.

  • Freedom for Praying: Few challenges are more difficult to overcome than disconnecting from the constant distraction of your phone to make room for focused times of prayer.

  • Freedom for Play: When you have an entire day disconnected from your phone, you find time to enjoy unhurried opportunities for fun and leisure with family and friends.

Your Relationship With Your Smartphone? It's Complicated!

Brief Overview:

In the first of four episodes on how healthy leaders use their smartphones, Matt and Tal show you the possibilities of using your smartphone in a different way. In the face of increased concerns about the holistic impact of smartphone use, healthy leaders are reimagining their relationship with their phone.

Benefits of Better Smartphone Use:

  • Heightened sense of security and gratitude. Research shows that smartphone use increases the risk of loneliness and depression. Mentally healthy leaders limit the time they spend on their phone.

  • Improved sleep. Your phone emits a level of radiation that disrupts the quality of your sleep. Physically healthy leaders keep their phone in another room at night.

  • Better connections in relationships. Our relationships are damaged by decreased eye contact as we scroll our phones. Relationally healthy leaders set boundaries on their phones when they’re spending time with people. 

  • Better able to hear God. Your phone creates an untold number of distractions from the time you spend listening to God through the Scriptures and responding in prayer. Spiritually healthy leaders consider the cost of using your phone to fuel your relationship with God.

  • More productive at work. Your productivity will increase and you will feel better at the end of the day if you are not glued to your phone. Vocationally healthy leaders limit their access to work-related apps on their phone. 

Are You Addicted To Work?

Brief Overview:

In this last installment of our series on work, Matt and Tal answer five questions that church leaders should wrestle with related to how much they work. We live in a world that celebrates ‘the hardest workers in the room’ but when does our hustle become a problem? What are the warning signs that we are becoming addicted to work? How do we put Pandora back in her box if our schedule is out of control and our heart is out of alignment with the way of Jesus?

Evaluation Questions:

  • Do you get more excited about work than your family or anything else? Misplaced love is a symptom of addiction.

  • Do you take work with you to bed, into the weekend and/or on vacation? When work spills into parts of life not intended for work, you squeeze out critical components of your health.

  • Do you believe it’s ok to work long hours if you love your work? Would you believe it's ok to excessively drink or play video games just because you love it?

  • Do you get irritated when people ask you to stop working to do something else? If you get irritated when someone asks you to stop doing something, that’s a sign your body and soul is becoming hooked.

  • Have your long hours hurt your family or other relationships? We dare you to ask your spouse or children...

Choose Health Over Hustle: A Masterclass On Getting The Most Out Of Work

Ever feel like you’re not hearing the whole truth about the benefits of hard work?

In my (Tal) work as a therapist, I tend to hear things differently than other people. I spend almost as much time listening to what is not being said as I do to what is being said. Here’s a great example - when a client walks into my office, I start with very complex question; you know something along the lines of “How’s it going?”

When you ask that question, what are some of the top answers you receive? What is your quick, unedited response to that question? I can tell you that the most frequent answer I get is, “Man, I’m busy.” Is that how you would respond?

You Are Not A Tetherball

Brief Overview

Pastoral The needs of the people we serve rarely fit easily inside of a tightly wound schedule. There is a level of flexibility that we must maintain in order to be with our people where they are, yet if we’re not careful we will find ourselves only doing surface-level work with little time and energy to focus on our best work. On this episode, we help you find the right strategy to focus on your most significant work and maintain accessibility to your church.


Big Ideas:

  • Distracted work is disappointing work. When you are distracted the quality of your work suffers. You were not made to multitask and focus deeply on your work. And while everything you do does not require a significant level of focus, eliminate distractions when you need to do deep work.

  • Different people need different strategies. Schedule deep work in hourlong, half-day or full-day installments. Use another account on your computer. Create a work environment that helps you focus and avoid distractions.

  • Great work manages distractions. Pay attention to the times of day and type of work when you feel frustrated by distractions. Use the ideas in this resource to develop and execute on a simple action plan. Don’t try to create the perfect plan - just take the next step and give yourself permission to make progress!

No More Saturday Night Specials

Brief Overview

We all know that having a schedule and keeping a schedule are important for pastors. But far too often, we don’t make the best use of our schedules and this damages both our preaching and our health. If you want to thrive as a preacher, here are a few ideas that will help you make and stick to your schedule.


Big Ideas:

  • Scrambling increases stress that damages your health. Forced, last minute sermon preparation increases anxiety, reduces the amount of time you sleep, challenges relationships and pushes time with God in prayer to the side. This is how you become a talking head.

  • Schedule your sermon preparation. Clarify the steps in your preparation process. Get each step on your calendar. Show up when that time is scheduled.

  • Schedule your sleep. Embrace your limitations and decide well in advance when you’re going to bed. Not only is this an act of worship, it’s a declaration of sanity. Your best work consistently happens when you get a good night’s sleep.

How's Work Going?

Brief Overview

Church leaders aren’t scared to work but struggle to do their best work. We feel guilty for not working harder, we’re frustrated that we’re not better at certain aspects of our work, and we feel like everyone else in our church thinks we don’t work hard enough. On this episode of the Five Factors podcast, Matt and Tal tackle those struggles head on and map out a better way to work.


Big Ideas:

  • The secret to great work is a leader who embraces their limits. Too many church leaders are always available, do work that belongs to someone else and are consistently distracted. Smart leaders create boundaries, priorities and focus on what matters most.

  • Audit your schedule. Make sure you’re clear on how much work you’re doing by tracking how your time is spent for a week. How many hours did you work? What exactly did you do during those hours? What did you accomplish at the end of the day?

  • Ask other leaders about their work. Ask five leaders in your church about their work. What time do they start and stop? How do they create boundaries, priorities and focus in their work?

Bryan Miles on A Better Way To Build Your Staff Culture

Brief Overview

At the heart of culture is relationships. How do people get along as they work to lead the mission of your church? Bryan Miles sits down with Matt to talk about the surprising benefit that comes when your staff has the flexibility to work remotely (at least part of the time).

 

Big Ideas:

·         Your next hire should be a virtual assistant. A virtual assistant increases the productivity of a pastor by 2x-4x. And great companies like Belay (belaysolutions.com) handle the training and management of your assistant, so you can focus on getting work done together.

·         Remote work increases staff productivity. When you treat someone like an adult, you end up with someone who does work with greater levels of joy and a higher sense of loyalty to you and the mission of your church.

·         People don’t need an office to thrive as workers. Connection and collaboration can take place with great results using digital platforms. What matters more than being together is what we accomplish together.

Scott Magdalein on A Better Way To Train Leaders

Big Ideas:

  • The best time to train volunteers is when they get started. Help volunteer leaders take their first step when they excited about the work and eager to learn. Take time to clarify their role, share the values of the team, and set expectations for their first work day.

  • The best way to share information is through online training. Time is a precious commodity that most people don’t want to invest for the sake of sharing information. Plus, many of our volunteer leaders need time to listen and process information before they’re ready to ask good questions or engage in conversation.

  • Trained Up makes it easy to get started training your volunteers. You don’t have to have volunteer training already figured out. Trained Up comes pre-loaded with over 600 videos inside multiple courses to help you.

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