health

Are You Addicted To Work?

Brief Overview:

In this last installment of our series on work, Matt and Tal answer five questions that church leaders should wrestle with related to how much they work. We live in a world that celebrates ‘the hardest workers in the room’ but when does our hustle become a problem? What are the warning signs that we are becoming addicted to work? How do we put Pandora back in her box if our schedule is out of control and our heart is out of alignment with the way of Jesus?

Evaluation Questions:

  • Do you get more excited about work than your family or anything else? Misplaced love is a symptom of addiction.

  • Do you take work with you to bed, into the weekend and/or on vacation? When work spills into parts of life not intended for work, you squeeze out critical components of your health.

  • Do you believe it’s ok to work long hours if you love your work? Would you believe it's ok to excessively drink or play video games just because you love it?

  • Do you get irritated when people ask you to stop working to do something else? If you get irritated when someone asks you to stop doing something, that’s a sign your body and soul is becoming hooked.

  • Have your long hours hurt your family or other relationships? We dare you to ask your spouse or children...

How's Work Going?

Brief Overview

Church leaders aren’t scared to work but struggle to do their best work. We feel guilty for not working harder, we’re frustrated that we’re not better at certain aspects of our work, and we feel like everyone else in our church thinks we don’t work hard enough. On this episode of the Five Factors podcast, Matt and Tal tackle those struggles head on and map out a better way to work.


Big Ideas:

  • The secret to great work is a leader who embraces their limits. Too many church leaders are always available, do work that belongs to someone else and are consistently distracted. Smart leaders create boundaries, priorities and focus on what matters most.

  • Audit your schedule. Make sure you’re clear on how much work you’re doing by tracking how your time is spent for a week. How many hours did you work? What exactly did you do during those hours? What did you accomplish at the end of the day?

  • Ask other leaders about their work. Ask five leaders in your church about their work. What time do they start and stop? How do they create boundaries, priorities and focus in their work?

Scott Magdalein on A Better Way To Train Leaders

Big Ideas:

  • The best time to train volunteers is when they get started. Help volunteer leaders take their first step when they excited about the work and eager to learn. Take time to clarify their role, share the values of the team, and set expectations for their first work day.

  • The best way to share information is through online training. Time is a precious commodity that most people don’t want to invest for the sake of sharing information. Plus, many of our volunteer leaders need time to listen and process information before they’re ready to ask good questions or engage in conversation.

  • Trained Up makes it easy to get started training your volunteers. You don’t have to have volunteer training already figured out. Trained Up comes pre-loaded with over 600 videos inside multiple courses to help you.

Justin Trapp on How To Build A Better Sermon

Brief Overview

Most preachers use a collection of digital tools to help prepare sermons. Until recently, there was no solution available that would provide a single resource that could help write, present and store your sermons. But Justin Trapp has created a fantastic resource called Sermonary that you should start using.

Big Ideas:

  • Pastors are pressed for time. From social media connections to internal pressure to do more, pastors find their schedules filled with tasks and meetings and conversations that make it challenging to find time to write sermons.

  • Pastors waste time organizing their research. From notes scribbled on legal pads to markups on digital resources inside a piece of Bible software, time and energy gets spent trying to remember what you studied and where you put it.

  • Sermonary simplifies and speeds up your preparation. From templates to sermon building blocks, Sermonary makes it easy to organize your message in a format that you can use to deliver your sermon without having to take time to print a manuscript or outline.

Elliot Grudem on How Pastors Build Friendships

Brief Overview

Healthy pastors have friends. But most pastors don’t have friends. So I asked Elliot Grudem to share what he’s learned helping pastors make friends through his work with Leaders Collective.

Big Ideas:

  • Pastoral work can be dehumanizing. In the eyes of most people, pastors are not actual people with feelings who are flawed and fallible. Pastors are seen as a commodity, often ignored until they’re needed and when they’re needed, they are expected to be immediately available.

  • Pastors need people who will encourage them. Ultimately, God is our great encourager but often he encourages us through other people, such as family and friends.

  • Friendships are necessary but most pastors have no friends. There is a difference between allies and confidants. Almost all of our work relationships are allies; confidants are harder to find. Elliot’s suggestion is to invest in relationships with other pastors who might become a confidant.

When Large Churches Hurt Small Churches

Biggest Takeaways You Don't Want To Miss:

·         Small churches and large churches are different. And while we know it’s true, those differences tend to be ignored and we become preoccupied with making every church a big church.

·         Large church pastors set the tone. Leverage the influence granted by your platform to encourage small church pastors and to tailor your message to their context.

·         A great church is a discipling church. Greatness is not determined by size, but by a commitment to help people follow Jesus.

·         A simple recipe for small church greatness. Identify what you’re good at. Do more of that. Celebrate the good things that you do.

 

If you are a small church pastor who recoils at the idea of anyone thinking that your church is small, please know that churches like yours are the bread-and-butter of Jesus’ kingdom. No other church can do in your city what you and your people can do.

Use our FREE Guide to discover how your church can be great.

Great churches love God and love people. But every local expression of the Church loves in ways that are unique to its people and its context. Rather than copying-and-pasting from other churches, use this FREE guide to map out the steps to finding your greatness.

No Leader Has Ever Been Encouraged Too Much

Biggest Takeaways You Don't Want To Miss:

  • Words matter. Every leader needs to know they’re making a difference. You’re not crazy for wanting to hear particular words about how you make the world better.
  • Discouragement is deadly. Pay attention to the warning signs of discouragement. It’s one thing to have a bad day, but when every day is a bad day…
  • Developing courage is a project. Dive into the reasons you feel discouraged. And do the work to get your feet under you and be the leader God created you to be. 

Let us help you build courage. Matt will help you take action.

It’s simply not enough to know that it’s important to lead with courage. You have to take what you know and put it into action. Let us help you take the awareness that you built by listening to this episode and take action.  Learn more here.

Mac Lake on Discipling Leaders In Your Church

Biggest Takeaways You Don't Want To Miss:

Sympathy or Empathy? That Is The Question...

Brief Overview:

In the first of four episodes on how healthy leaders use their smartphones, Matt and Tal show you the possibilities of using your smartphone in a different way. In the face of increased concerns about the holistic impact of smartphone use, healthy leaders are reimagining their relationship with their phone.

Benefits of Better Smartphone Use:

  • Heightened sense of security and gratitude. Research shows that smartphone use increases the risk of loneliness and depression. Mentally healthy leaders limit the time they spend on their phone.

  • Improved sleep. Your phone emits a level of radiation that disrupts the quality of your sleep. Physically healthy leaders keep their phone in another room at night.

  • Better connections in relationships. Our relationships are damaged by decreased eye contact as we scroll our phones. Relationally healthy leaders set boundaries on their phones when they’re spending time with people. 

  • Better able to hear God. Your phone creates an untold number of distractions from the time you spend listening to God through the Scriptures and responding in prayer. Spiritually healthy leaders consider the cost of using your phone to fuel your relationship with God.

  • More productive at work. Your productivity will increase and you will feel better at the end of the day if you are not glued to your phone. Vocationally healthy leaders limit their access to work-related apps on their phone. 

Barnabas Piper on Doubt, Curiosity and Preachers’ Kids

Biggest Takeaways You Don't Want To Miss:

Being curious and leaving room for doubt is a critical secret of healthy leadership. Not only is it vital to cultivate that kind of culture in your church, it’s important that you give yourself permission to live this out yourself.

Web Statistics